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Written by Jaclyn Jaconetta for The Brooklyn Rail, October 2017
“Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin's exhibition Like Water and Oil Never Assimilating (2017) is simultaneously an education on racist American history and an ongoing effort to tend to its casualties. Shin is a Korean-Canadian-American artist, curator, and community organizer. In her exhibition at the AC Institute, masses of news clippings set the tone, situating the work in instances of historical racism.”


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Written by Benjamin Sutton for Hyperallergic, September 2017
“the legacy of eroticized Asian imagery and characters in science fiction will be followed by a screening of moving-image artworks that use Afrofuturism, Asiafuturism, and other empowering cybernetic iconographies to expose systems of oppression and exploitation.”


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Written by Antwaun Sargent for Vice, July 2017
“as viewers walk through the space, which takes on the real dimensions of a home, they'll see themselves physically and will recall, through the artworks Morris created, their own memories of the happiness and melancholy of home, memory and personal identity. In this way, viewers become a part of the landscape Morris created at the AC Institute.”


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Written by Raphael Rosen for the Wall Street Journal, March 2013
“Rhode Island artist China Blue’s new sonic installation, “Photini (Biomimetic Fireflies),” is on view at the AC Institute in Chelsea until March 16.”


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Written by Adam Gopnik for the New Yorker, March 2010
“The television-for-plants project has been installed in a fifth-floor space at the AC Institute, on West Twenty-seventh Street, in Chelsea. A collection of houseplants—the kind of rubber plants that your great-aunt watered and tended—rest on the floor, thoughtfully regarding a video on a screen above their heads. The video shows, on a six-and-a-half-minute loop, a beautiful Italian sky, which passes into night, complete with romantic Italian moon, and then returns to dawn. Visitors are urged to bring their own plants to watch the show.”